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Saturday, October 9, 2010

Winnie Monsod to Migrants: You Betray the Filipino People

This video of Winnie Monsod's last lecture haunts me. It represents what I have come to despise about nationalism, false nationalism, that is, combined with simple thinking. The part that got to me the most was this. She says:
If you are going to help this country, you've got to be in the country... If any of you have ambitions of going abroad so you can earn more, please disabuse yourself, because by doing that you are essentially betraying the people in the Philippines..."
I take nothing away from her, she seems to have good intentions. But I must respectfully disagree.

People are not less filipino, wherever they may be. Being outside the country for money does not necessarily mean you betray anything, even if you went to a free public school. And responsibility does not imply having to stay put where you were born.

Suppose Monsod is right, then the same should apply to internal movement. Using the same logic, if you are going to help Cebu, then you've got to be in Cebu. Consequently, let's not have educated Cebuanos who graduated from the top high schools there move to Manila, because that's harmful to Cebu.  Let's not have Cagayanons in Manila since they are much needed in Cagayan de Oro. In fact, let's make it policy and let everyone from the provinces sign a contract when they study in Ateneo or UP that stipulates them to go back where they come from. This is fair. Let's not have people move for money, because it would hurt their hometowns. And let's call these people who escape our grasp, betrayers to Cebu and CDO.

Many of us, I assume, would be uncomfortable with this. Perhaps because we implicitly know that the linkages between Cebu and Cebuanos are more complex than it seems, are less simple than whether the latter is absent or present, whether he/she sends money home or not. Perhaps because we know of people, fellow classmates, who have come to Manila from the provinces and stayed, and have been better for it. We dare not call these people traitors. Neither do the ones left behind in Cebu think that way. But we apply a double standard to international migrants.

My girlfriend is from CDO and is now an investment banker in Manila, although her family is back down south. The Philippines (and CDO) are now better because she stays in Manila and does the productive work that she does. If CDO forced her back to Mindanao, then what would she do, it's not like there's investment banking there. She would be unhappy. She would contribute less to the general economy. And in the first place, she would not have invested as much in her human capital as she did. Would this be a great development strategy?

Nobody ever leaves strictly for money. This makes Monsod's claim trivial (i.e. it applies to no one). Either that or she means it to apply to all migrants. Because surely, people move in some part due to economic opportunity. But it is never only that. If you talk to most of OFWs, it's also to give a better future for their kids, etc. To the more educated ones, its probably for career opportunities, to be at the cutting edge of their fields. Or to explore different countries and to learn more. These people do not necessarily love their countries less. Okay, maybe some do not care at all, but the median person, if you look at the data, does. And the average migrant does not send merely trinkets of money home; he sends loads.

Let's not even talk about remittances. Let's talk about Leah Salonga who spent much of her career abroad. Would it have been best for the Philippines, who produced her, nurtured her, to have kept her in its shores? No. She could have been performing at Repertory Philippines all her life but it was much better for her, for her country, that she remained in NYC to become the brilliant star of Miss Saigon. She brought more acclaim to the Philippines than she could have if she had stayed. For this, we celebrate her. I would find it ironic if in a different breath we called her a traitor.

If Monsod is right, then let's call the biggest betrayer of all Jose Rizal. After all, he spent most of his time abroad after being educated by an elite university. That ungrateful bastard! He, who wrote Noli Me Tangere outside the country, surely did nothing to contribute anything towards our nation. This guy would not stay put in Manila; in fact if I remember correctly he was on his way to Puerto Rico when his boat was seized and turned back.

But Rizal could not have written the things he did had he not lived in Madrid, Paris, Germany or even the US for a short while. Alternatively, he could have settled to be the village doctor like he became in exile in Dapitan, and stayed put, but his impact would have been far, far less. History would have taken a different course.

Should responsibility be confined to staying in the place you were born in? It shouldn't be. But if it must be so, then call me irresponsible. I am glad to betray the filipino people.

(to be continued...)

67 comments:

Kri Roderos said...

I agree with you on all points. Hayaan mo na. Winnie Monsod strikes me as crazy sometimes. Oops. Hehe. CDO and Cebu represent! Hehe.

Anonymous said...

BRAVO! What a wonderful commentary, thank you.

It's so sad though that Monsod even made that comment. I find her thoughts to be quite sound, so this is unusual.

Nikki! said...

I have to admit that I was hit by a pang of guilt after watching Mrs. Monsod's speech. I'm now 2 months out of the country, just recently overturning the promise I made when I was young to never work abroad.

I am glad that someone was able to articulate, and even defend!, what I can only call a gut feel of mine, that there is nothing to be ashamed about, even after watching the speech.

But, I think Mrs. Monsod isn't all wrong. Because I think, I feel, she purposefully exaggerated her speech. She _is_ addressing college students, and with that context in mind, do you think she would have made even a slight impression if she hadn't been as, I dunno, theatrical as she was? I think, if I remember correctly, she tends to delve into sweeping generalizations and oversimplifications, especially when dealing with subjective matters.

If I am wrong, and that's what she really believes, that state university alumni turned overseas workers like myself have betrayed the country, then I still wouldn't feel negatively against her. I'd take it as a call, a reminder, to never forget to, not just pay back (not everybody feels that they owe their country anything, but to simply give something to our country. I'd treat it as a reminder to never lose our sense of nationalism.

Still, as you said it, I must also respectfully disagree with her. Thank you for your eloquence. :)

Anonymous said...

I find it a dreadful indignity to have a soul controlled by geography

Anonymous said...

I think she meant don't leave the Philippines kapag nag U.P. ka? Kasi mura nag tuition dahil pera ng bansa yun? I don't know. Kindly correct me if I misunderstood.

Anonymous said...

*mura "ang" tuition

Anonymous said...

serving foreign countries does not mean you do not love your own country, you just followed one of prof. monsod's advice: do not be a part of the country's problem.

Anonymous said...

Her last lecture is not intended to throw stones at our OFWs. The point is just being patriotic enough to contribute to the country. Her speech was intended to graduating students who want to earn more for their own. Sabi nga, "ang hindi marunong lumingon sa pinanggalingan ay hindi makararating sa paroroonan".

Paolo Abarcar said...

But she did say, and these are her exact words, "If you are going to help this country, you've got to be in the country.. If any of you have ambitions of going abroad so you can earn more, please disabuse yourself, because by doing that you are essentially betraying the people in the Philippines." How can I not understand that as, if you are not here, you are not helping, and therefore you betray us?

If her intention was only to talk about graduating students who want to earn more for their own, then as i've said, this either applies to no one, or to everyone. If it's the former then why does she need to say this. If it is the latter, then I would have to argue against. Because nobody ever leaves strictly for money. Because surely, people move in some part due to economic opportunity. But it is never only that. If you talk to most of OFWs, it's also to give a better future for their kids, etc. To the more educated ones, its probably for career opportunities, to be at the cutting edge of their fields. Or to explore different countries and to learn more. These people do not necessarily love their countries less, as you say.

Anonymous said...

i've always remember mareng winnie as full of drama and hysterics back in diliman. she's a good teacher (read: theoretical) but can never hold well in the real world. she's too u.p., too idealistic. although she does have a point regarding brain drain, i must admit. over-emphasizing her point is her style... to the dismay of non-u.p. on-lookers.

Anonymous said...

*i've always rememberED

Anonymous said...

she's talking to her students in UP. please please please do try to put things you read in context. she's talking about paying the country back the cost of educating a UP student! she's specifically talking about UP students subsidized by Filipinos' taxes going abroad. that these people should try to PAY BACK the government that put them thru school if they will be employed abroad!

its people like you who refuse to do their homework first who make Filipinos everywhere look bad.

Mika Santos said...

I agree with your defense, but at the same time I sympathize with her point. I guess it would depend on the intentions of the migrant. There are those who leave the country to look for a better a life and never look back.. and then there are those who leave to learn a thing or two, and then bring it back home to contribute something here. I'm all for the latter. Sure, earn money abroad, but send it back home please. Learn something abroad, and apply it back home for the benefit of those who can't afford to learn it elsewhere. Become rich and famous, but declare your humble island roots. You know what I mean.

I love to travel, and I'd love to experience living abroad. But every part of me and my idealistic loyalty to this darn country will urge me to come back eventually.

Anonymous said...

"i've always remember mareng winnie as full of drama and hysterics back in diliman. she's a good teacher (read: theoretical) but can never hold well in the real world. she's too u.p., too idealistic. although she does have a point regarding brain drain, i must admit. over-emphasizing her point is her style... to the dismay of non-u.p. on-lookers."

You're kidding, right? How can she not hold well in the real world when she even became the Socio-Economic Planning Secretary, Chairman of COMELEC, a multi-awarded, journalist, professor emeritus, etc. if she hasn't shown her mettle in the real world?

Economists work on theory. But successful economists know how to connect it to reality.

Anonymous said...

not kidding at all. that is MY opinion. it's all just pomp and circumstance the way i see it. to be professor emeritus, multi-awarded, and be a government official in this country doesn't necessarily mean you're good at all. it's all about who you're close with and what you say (esp. if you're good at swaying from left to right without qualms). look at the national artist awardees. look at the government people. look at the catholic church. look at comelec. look at congress. look at the ampatuans, the singsons, the cojuangcos, the lopezes. look at the hk hostages. i can go on and on.
here in the campus, mareng winnie is known to be an overly outspoken teacher who, i think, needs to learn some tact. she is, first and foremost, a teacher. coming as a close second, she is a media creation.
if she was such a good socio-economic planning secretary, what happened? why are the professionals still leaving? when's her plan kicking in? must be all theoretical. it just doesn't add up.

Anonymous said...

again, let me point out before we get talk about something else: mareng winnie does have a point regarding brain drain (referring to iskos and iskas). over-emphasizing her point is her style. if she became your teacher once in econ, you'd know this. if not, too bad and her o.a. lecture wasn't for you.

Anonymous said...

and fyi, mareng winnie was not chairman of comelec
it was her husband, christian monsod

Anonymous said...

for me, moving from one province to another is different from moving from 1 country to another... i think gusto lang nya i-point out na nauubusan ang Pinas ng professionals... mga doctors natin, pumupunta sa ibang bansa so kumokonti ang population ng doctors sa pinas na pagpipilian ng mga hospitals.. same is tru sa programmers, particularly cobol programmers... ang daming pumupunta sa SG or MY kasi mas malaki ang sahod dun, kaso lang yung mga bangko natin dito sa pinas eh nauubusan naman ng experienced programmers... i'm not against pinoys going abroad kasi ako mismo naiisip ko rin.. pero i agree sa point nya na kelagnan tayo ng pinas :) kung aalis ako, magkukulang na naman ng isang magaling (hahaha) na cobol programmer ang pinas... :D

Anonymous said...

yeah that's why Andres Bonifacio should be the real hero and not Rizal.

Israel said...

The lecture was simple. It was for students of U.P. - to pay back the cost of their education if they want to work abroad. That is it. By not doing so, you betray the Filipino people who put you through school.


This is simple guys - 'cmon. I had to laugh when Lea Salonga was brought up.

I love UP said...

Wow professor emeritus on Economics and look at Philippine economics today, it sucks big time. How about her? She stayed here in Phili and how did she contribute to Philippine economy aside from being a know-it-all parrot (I really dont know, haha).

We medical, engineers and science professionals have contributed more than she could imagine (money, pride, technology, etc.). So keep the change Mareng Winnie. Somebody please give big bucks to School of Econ, I think too few Econ alumni (if any) gives back to their college since Econ grads have low to none demand abroad.

But we can all forgive her, she is just talking to students, and we all know how its like in UP, its a dream land of perfection and excellence.

Now I remember why she lost big time in the Senatorial Elections way before, she is a parrot living in a golden cage and she is above reality.

We are all expecting your ghost...

Paolo Abarcar said...

Some replies to the comments:

1. I am, in fact, taking her speech in context. I do mean this "defense" to cover migrants but also UP graduates who have plans to go abroad. it's the same reasoning. So what if their education was paid by the government? Same reasoning applies. Some Cebuanos had their high schools paid for. Should we force them to move back to Cebu?

2. I see no difference between provincial migration and international migration. how are they fundamentally different? The mechanics are the same right, if your argument is that if you leave, you harm those left behind.

Anonymous said...

Excuse me but your analogy regarding Cebu-Manila vis-a-vis Philippines-Migrating to other parts of the world is flatly erroneous. I'm sorry to this. The education of Filipinos, from elementary to highschool, being compulsory, is FUNDED by the entire Filipino people -- through taxes -- education is a NATIONAL policy, not provincial, not local. (So you see, the lowly tambay who buys yosis and buy Ginebra in the kanta pays taxes, through the sin taxes, or the labandera who buys kakarampot na grocery in the store does pay taxes -- they in effect pay a part of the education of Filipinos. Maybe not you perhaps because you were entirely educated by private education (and you are a minority in this country). Winnie Monsod was pointedly speaking to UP students whose education is funded by taxes by the Filipino people -- even those who pay full tution are still subsidized.

Nationalism? It's not nationalism. Anyone can wave a flag and feel proud that Charice Pempengo or Pacquio is a Filipino -- now that's what you call shallow nationalism.

What Winnie Monsod is pointing out is PATRIOTISM. Go luck up that in the dictionary. What's the diff? I am ashamed to say that even Chinese-Filipinos who are not even full-blooded Filipinos choose to stay here and in fact, are the among the most PATRIOTIC people in this country. They love the Philippines. Go figure out why.

Sorry, if I you got me riled me up. I hate to see erroneous, fallacious analysis to make a point, such as yours.

P.S. You're gunning for a PhD? Oh boy, elementary logic. You should go back to that and review.

Anonymous said...

errata:

it should read: "I am sorry to say this".

kanta = "kanto"

Paolo Abarcar said...

My point was that migrants "pay" back their dues in other ways and that staying away does not mean you are not paying your dues.

That's a good argument actually when you say education is a national policy so international migration is different from internal. Good. So you say, that migrants to Manila are able to contribute back to Cebu because the productivity they generate in Manila is channeled back to the province through education policy.

However, you can also make a similar argument for international migrants. They go abroad, contribute to the economy there. And what is generated is foreign aid back to the Philippines. This is not even counting remittances which is a larger, much larger chunk. Even enough to pay for their UP tuition many times.

Anonymous said...

"That's a good argument actually when you say education is a national policy so international migration is different from internal. Good."

Thank you, because your analogy was fallacious.

"However, you can also make a similar argument for international migrants. They go abroad, contribute to the economy there. And what is generated is foreign aid back to the Philippines. This is not even counting remittances which is a larger, much larger chunk. Even enough to pay for their UP tuition many times."

Oh, you mean in monetary terms? Let's begin with that -- tell me in billions of money lost to educating people who go abroad and never come back, these are real taxes from all Filipino people -- yes, even Mang Pandoy who buy yosi in the kanto. I take exception for OFWS who send money, not people who PERMANENTLY MIGRATE Is it all about money? How do put a value to brain drain? To lost opportunities for people, educated people, who could have fashion/designed, conceptualized solutions to the problems in the country. I don't know where you get your economics 101? We educate our children so that they will serve other people -- and remmittances aint gonna equal the scale. NOt by a long shot. As Winnie Monsod told those UP medicine students SLAP SLAP SLAP. The OFW labor policy has been around since the 1970s -- it has been 30 years past at least -- and where are we know? Even worse. You have OFWs -- who have children who become OFWs like their parents, and their children will become too. And are they well off. No, look around you. OFW children in general are spendrifts, they don't how much their parents slave away in foreign lands.... OPPPS.

WE're getting into other topics. HAve to go.

My unsolicited advice: Go have a PhD thesis on the whether overseas migration have been a boon or bane to the country... in terms of poverty level, indicators of quality of life, GDP per capita (real terms please, not nominal). Good Luck!

Then go publish that report. We need scholarly stuff, solid research, not mere perceptions -- we these and that.

Thank you.

Anonymous said...

Nice read, Pao :)

Shem Cristobal said...

Monsod started her speech by putting the student's perspective as leaders now, tells them why they are leaders now and charges them that honor must precede their excellence. Then she asked what is the next step and it is to help the country, and to me the message is to help the country as being leaders. IMHO, you'll find so much challenges leading if you'll migrate to foreign land. As leaders you must surrender yourself to your constituents, be with them, bear them. "you must be in the country" so Monsod puts it.

Anonymous said...

The decision to leave the country or stay in the Philippines is not just a simple matter. Each of us are in different situations and circumstances in life that could markedly influence our decision to leave or stay so to judge and label would not be proper. For me, the important thing that we should all remember is that whether we choose to work in the country or work overseas, WE SHOULD JUST DO OUR VERY BEST TO MAKE OUR COUNTRY PROUD. I am not sure if you want to call a Filipino who stays in the Philippines and does corrupt ways, choses to remain a bum or sells drugs PATRIOTIC just because he or she did not leave the country. Being in the country is not the only means to show patriotism. I think this applies to all Filipinos whether we are U.P.graduates or not.

Anonymous said...

you missed the point. mrs monsod was speaking infront of HER STUDENTS, or UP students, and not generally TO all pinoys - but those "scholar ng bayan".

she wants those scholar ng bayan to at least "give back" by serving here in the philippines because they owe it to the pinoy taxpayers.

adrianbauda said...

pasensya na po, mahina pong mag-english, siguro po hindi para sa iyo, sa akin, o kaninuman ang mensahe ni madam Winnie, ang pagkaintindi ko po,ito ay ibinigay n'ya sa mga estudyante ng UP Diliman. sa aking pananaw, maraming nagpunta ng ibang bayan upang maghanapbuhay ang nagsasabing ginawa nila ito hindi dahil sa mataas na sahod kundi upang paunlarin ang sariling kakayahan. subalit marami rin sa nagpaunlad ng sariling kakayahan ang tila nakalimot. gaano ba katagal ang pagpapaunlad ng sariling kakayahan, ito ba'y isang taon, sampung taon o habangbuhay? hindi po ba maganda na sa bawat bagong kakayahan na ating natututunan ay ating ibahagi sa lalong madaling panahon sa napakaraming Pilipinong nanganga-ilangan. tanong ko lang po, gaano katagal na po ba kayo sa inyong kinaroroonan ngayon.

Paolo Abarcar said...

I agree. Monsod was speaking to HER STUDENTS. But I meant to speak to all Filipinos, which includes HER STUDENTS as well -- to those who want to migrate but feel threatened, to those who will be abroad, like the rest of us, to whom Monsod is implicitly speaking to as well.

It doesn't matter if you were educated in Ateneo, UP, or if the government paid your tuition or not. Migrants pay back more than their share. And I am not just talking about remittances. You do not have to be in the country to contribute.

Anonymous said...

But the point is that, she's NOT speaking to all Filipinos. So your argument is already flawed.

I'm from UP myself and working as an OFW. I don't get offended by Prof. Monsod's lecture. Actually I got enlightened. You don't need to defend for me. I know majority of UP Alumni working overseas will get her point and won't get offended. :)

Greg Ramos said...

Nakakaiyak ang kalidad ng debate dito. Pipols: walang kinalaman sa migration ang paglubog ng Pinas. Dito pa lang sa Comments section, alam mo na kung ba't wala tayong asenso. Puro pa kayo Anonymous, mga duwag!

Go home ang plant kamote! Hindi nag-isip si Monsod, dakdak lang siya nang dakdak kasi hindi siya handa sa lecture niya. May pa-fale-fallacious pa kayo diyan. (Di ba bastos iyon?)

At kung bakit di umaasenso ang Pilipinas kong mahal? We have an excess supply of morons --'yan ang aking diagnosis. At kaya nga okey sa aking maging OFW ang mga taga-UP. Para mabawas-bawasan naman ang traffic sa EDSA at Commonwealth. Diagnosis ko iyan, evidence-based. Libre 'yan. And you can take that to bank.

Anonymous said...

like what you said mr abaca . . . simple thinking . . . . prof monsod was speaking to HER students . . . she wasn't even speaking to you or to the OFWs . . . dumbass doctoral student. san ka ba nag aral Dr to be? Sana sa UP D ka na lang nag PhD! para kasama ka sa napagsabihan ni mareng winnie

Anonymous said...

Sa tingin ko hindi ka magiging magaling na economist, political advisor etc...kasi simpleng context hindi mo maintindihan. simple lang, ang sinabi ay simple lang, na sana pag-ikaw ay full scholar sana naman pakinabangan ka muna ng bayan na nagpa-aral sayo, not necessarily your entire life but atleast serve the people who worked for you so you can study.

well said, that guy from U.P. kasi kung taga UP ka or any other State University at totoong may utak ka at marunong kang magisip, you will not be offended but it will make you think and ponder to say the least.

Henry said...

Prof. Monsod was speaking to her students, and not just students -- they are trained to become leaders or already a leader at that point. She is entrusting her student, those selected few leaders; that they will become the starting point of changes and solutions to be made for the betterment of this country. If they -- the students -- the trained leaders, starts to go off the country because of their little ambitions to earn more then what would you think will happen here? That's what we will be calling a domino effect, where the leader goes the follower follows. What would happen if every single Filipino migrates to other country.

earlroybaker2 said...

ok, i dont know if i would make sense with what im about to say. but i'll say it anyways.

she started her lecture emphasizing that the scholars ng bayan are leaders already in their own country because they have the brain. this already sets them apart from almost everyone else here in the philippines.

i think, what she's trying to say is since you are already above everyone else, isn't it your responsibility to lead those who are less educated than you who paid for your tuition?

furthermore, if you are in another country, and yeah, there are more opportunities and education there, wouldn't it mean that there are people who would lead you?

now im not saying that you shouldn't listen to what others can teach you. but rather why not, teach what you know first to those who don't know before learning something knew from someone who knows better than you.

Lead.

i hope i make sense.

earlroybaker2 said...

teach what you know first to those who don't know before learning something knew from someone who knows better than you.---- new not knew! damn it! haha

Greg Ramos said...

Like I said, excess supply of...

Anonymous said...

@Greg Ramos

"Nakakaiyak ang kalidad ng debate dito. Pipols: walang kinalaman sa migration ang paglubog ng Pinas. Dito pa lang sa Comments section, alam mo na kung ba't wala tayong asenso. Puro pa kayo Anonymous, mga duwag!"

sir, kaya naka-ANONYMOUS kasi maaring walang ID/username nitong GoogleID, Livejournal, etc.

mas madaling magpost ng comment using anonymous, which is kung hindi gumamit ng comment plugin ang blogger dito, malamang walang anonymous.

gets mo kaya?

Greg Ramos said...

Hoy tanga. Gamitin mo ang Name/URL sa drop down menu. Kasama ka sa "excess supply..."

earlroybaker2 said...

the thing is, oo sige maraming tanga dito sa pinas, ang problema, ung mga tao din naman walang ginagawa para baguhin yon.

Greg Ramos said...

@earlroybaker2

korek ka jan. atchaka ba't di marunong magmaneho 'yang mga jeep at taxi? at saka ba't napakaliit na ang regular yum? at kailan ibabalik ang tambalang al tantay at rio locsin? at ano ang ibig sabihin ng "the thing is"? the thing is what? what is the thing? was ist das?

Anonymous said...

We are all aware that it is the Filipino taxpayers who subsidized the tuition of UP students and all other public schools and institutions. However, a lot of people can not see that these taxpayers are also the parents and relatives of the bright and intelligent students, privileged to enter and study at the governemnt-subsidized schools. UP's "top-quality education" is the promise and responsibility of the government to its people's children. It is supposed to be the payback of the government to its hardworking people, and not the other way around. Otherwise, I would see it as a form of enslaving the bright Filipinos. Sa tingin din kaya ni Prof. Monsod, utang na loob ng mga Pilipino sa kaniya ang kaniyang pananatili sa bansa at pagtuturo sa UP kung saan mababa ang seldo?

Greg Ramos said...

@Henry

"What would happen if every single Filipino migrates to other country?"

SLEX traffic would be much lighter. Also, most likely, we would all have jobs, those without jobs will have their host government to help them, and our children would have better prospects. Is that such a terrible outcome?

Greg Ramos said...

At kayong mga Ingles nang Ingles --

Go home and plant kamote. Iningles ni'yo ako nguni't kulang!

Greg Ramos said...

@Henry

"What would happen if every single Filipino migrates to other country?"

ps
And when they move to other country, they can buy denim short at Macy, or slong leeved shirt at Filene Basement and Mark & Spencer. Or book at Barn and Noble, maybe Border?

Anonymous said...

First try to understand that it was her student who filmed this lecture and she did not request nor imposed on her student to do so.

Second, it was intended to her students enrolled in her Econ 101 class and not for everyone who saw the viral video. You're not included as her intended audience.

Third, it was mentioned as a comment from another site, and I agree, that UP Students should be more affected because the lecture. It was meant as a conscience call to those who earned their education from one of the best universities in the country paid for by the Filipino people.

How many Filipinos do you know who send their hard earned money from abroad only to be given to perfect strangers living under one of the many bridges of Quezon City?

Efren Pe├▒aflorida caught the world's attention through CNN, can you beat that? Or better yet, can you even compare to that?

Greg Ramos said...

re: Efren Penaflorida ...CNN..beat that...yada

Huh? Watchootalkinbout Willis?

Greg Ramos said...

@Mika Santos

"I love to travel, and I'd love to experience living abroad. But every part of me and my idealistic loyalty to this darn country will urge me to come back eventually."

Ah, the convenience of hypotheticals.

Go home and plant kamote!

Greg Ramos said...

"i'm not against pinoys going abroad kasi ako mismo naiisip ko rin.. pero i agree sa point nya na kelagnan tayo ng pinas :) kung aalis ako, magkukulang na naman ng isang magaling (hahaha) na cobol programmer ang pinas..."

dehin, bro, cool lang naman kami dito kung umales ka. kelagnan lagn e huwag pagpaliten agn n at g, dahil baka mukha kang tagna. gets mo, bro? (hahaha)

Anonymous said...

This is dumb. Entertaining at best, but still dumb.

Anonymous said...

Wasted my time reading this.
Don't defend your decisions. Stand by them. Be a man.

Anonymous said...

Dude you make me puke. Read Rizal's bio ok? Before Ms Monsod slaps you with the facts.

Anonymous said...

"Sa tingin din kaya ni Prof. Monsod, utang na loob ng mga Pilipino sa kaniya ang kaniyang pananatili sa bansa at pagtuturo sa UP kung saan mababa ang seldo?"

Iyan ang UP, kung saan hindi wasto ang paggamit ng mga salitang "kung saan". Korek, Prof Rio Alma? At iyong "seldo" -- para mga kelot ng city jail; iyong "selda" -- para sa mga bulaklak ng city jail.

Dude Manzano said...

"Dude you make me puke. Read Rizal's bio ok? Before Ms Monsod slaps you with the facts."

Er...what part of Rizal's bio exactly did Paolo get wrong, Your Dudeness? Slap me with them facts, Dude-ski, slap me!

PSBA rocks said...

Kung tinapos ni Monsod ang PhD niya, baka mas matino sana ang lecture niya.

Just saying, dudes. Don't tase me, bro.

Anonymous said...

Dude Manzano, tell me, what's your IQ. Then I'll answer your question.

Let Mr Paolo answer. Who are you, his lawyer? Dumb.

Anonymous said...

Panawagan:

Kung puro mga taga-UP ang mga nagkokome-komentaryo dito, nais ko lang iparating: karumaldumal ang English, Filipino at Logic ninyo! At iyong Atenista diyan -- isa ka pa. At iyong Lasalista, ang galing mong magpatawa, dude. Kayong lahat: mag-seaman na lang kayo. Malaking tulong iyan sa bayan. Hindi ko kayo ituturing na mga traydor, peksman.

Dude Manzano said...

"Dude Manzano, tell me, what's your IQ. Then I'll answer your question. Let Mr Paolo answer. Who are you, his lawyer? Dumb."

Hahahaha! FYI, may question mark po sa dulo ng interrogative sentence. ("What's your IQ?" Ganoon po.) Wala po iyong kinalaman sa IQ-IQ. Sa Grade One ko po iyon natutunan. Am I his lawyer? No, I am Da Pulis! Hahahaha! Did you get the joke, dude?

Anonymous said...

ang daming naguguilty sa sinabi ni Monsod haha

Anonymous said...

The speech is intended for UP students. The idea that this speech stems from is the fact that UP students are subsidized by the government. This is human capital invested on by the government. But one batch of medical students from PGH moved out of the country after graduation to practice and raise families abroad. The speech is site-specific, delivered to freshman (not graduating) students. How does the Philippines benefit from the migration of the supposedly best and the brightest, much more those she has invested upon. In Singapore, civil service is required of state university graduates. With the growing diaspora of Filipinos, the Philippines benefits less from what it has claimed to be cream of its crop, educated.

Simple lang naman, Pao, ang hinanakit ni Monsod. Kung Filipinas ang nagtanim, nagbayo, at nagsaing, at Estados Unidos ang kakain, hindi ba't isang kahihiyan?

Kung natamaan ka, marahil may isang bahagi sa iyong nasasaktan dahil alam mong mayroong katotohanan. Ang totoo, hindi lahat ng lumalabas ng bansa may nasyonalismong katulad mo. Iilan lamang kayo. Hindi simpleng kabulastugan ang malimutang maglingkod sa bayan. Huwag mong pag-isahin ang sariling ambisyon sa ambisyon para sa bansa. Hindi ito magtutugma.

Hindi ka pinipigilan ng nasyonalismo upang mag-aral sa ibang bansa. Ngunit hinihingi nito ang iyong pagsisilbi sa iyong tinubuang lupa. Narito ang iyong kasaysayan, narito ang iyong kaakuhan, narito ang mga pamana ng iyong lahi. Narito ang lupang ipinagtanggol ng ating mga ninuno. Kung mananatili ka sa pananaw na kulong sa pera at indibiduwal na tagumpay, walang masama pero huwag mong ituring ang sarili mong makabayan. Dapat mo ring hingin mula sa mga mag-aaral ng UP na magbalik. Oo, Atenista ka. Pero tiyak kong alam mo, lalo na ng gf mo na ang investment sa human capital ng ating pamahalaan sa tertiary level, lalo na sa UP, ay hindi good investment kung hindi sila pakikinabangan.

Greg Ramos said...

@Anonymous of June 10, 2011.

Hoy tanga. Mag-migrate ka na. Malaking tulong sa Pilipinas kong mahal. Makabawas-bawas.

Anonymous said...

Funny how a lot of comments here miss the point of the post by a light year. :)

Anonymous said...

@Greg Ramos

puro ka sabi ng tanga .. ikaw ang tanga! nakakairita mga post mong tanga ka! ... buong lahi mo siguro mga tanga ... puro tanga lang ba kaya mong sabihing tanga ka!!!

Anonymous said...

What a great lecture. I dont see any reason for anybody to criticize her for this. I am one of those na tinamaan ng bato sa lecture na ito and it made me realize na may utang akong dapat bayaran sa Pilipinas. Walang dapat pag debatehan sa lecture na yun. Ang taong may common sense will understand Winnie's point and intentions and its all good - Noel

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